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Want to know more about how to identify all the styles of mid-century houses around the country? Look no further than our style guide. We name the styles and highlight common components that help identify a style.

A FIELD GUIDE TO
MID-CENTURY HOUSES
WWW.MAKEITMIDCENTURY.COM
Copyright © 2019
by Susan E. Halla | Make it Mid-Century, LLC
Second Edition
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be
reproduced or used in any manner without written
permission of the copyright owner.
First edition published in blog form 11/2017
CONTENTSCONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ................... 2
TRADITIONAL ..................... 4
MINIMALTRADITIONAL.......... 5
THEREVIVALS..................11
NON-TRADITIONAL ................19
USONIAN......................21
LUSTRON......................25
INTERNATIONALSTYLE..........29
RANCHES ........................ 33
RAISEDRANCH.................35
SPLIT-LEVEL................... 39
TRI-LEVEL......................43
STORYBOOK...................47
MODERNS ...................... 51
MINIMALMODERN............53
EICHLER.....................57
ALEXANDER..................61
VACATION HOMES ...............65
A-FRAME.....................67
VACATIONCABIN..............71
LOGCABIN...................75
POPULUXE ......................79
GOOGIE......................81
SPACEAGE...................85
GEODESIC...................89
CONCLUSION ...................93
CREDITS ........................95
1
2
What does a mid-century house look like to you?
Asymmetrical?
High design?
Screams California?
Not so fast. Mid-century homes are everywhere, and
they come in all shapes, sizes, and styles. In fact, most
mid-century homes are not high-style mid-century
modern. There are quite a number of styles that can all
call themselves mid-century.
While everyone has a take on what years constitute
mid-century, for the purposes of this guide, we are
using the 1930s through the 1970s. Even though we’re
starting with the 1930s, the greatest contribution to
mid-century housing stock occurred starting in the mid-
to-late 1940s when men came back from WWII and
started having families. These early homes veered more
towards traditional styling as you’ll see at the beginning
of this guide.
Our guide will help to identify the styles and what
attributes to look for on your hunt for the (not so rare)
mid-century house.
INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION
3
Believe it or not, many mid-century homes are pretty
traditional. Simple shapes, hipped roofs, divided lite
windows and paneled doors are some of the traditional
hallmarks of these early mid-century homes. Don’t
judge a book by its cover; home exteriors can be
misleading many of these traditional homes have
modern touches on their interiors.
TRADITIONALTRADITIONAL
193Os to 197Os
4
5
MINIMAL TRADITIONALMINIMAL TRADITIONAL
Your might be living right next door to a minimal
traditional and not even appreciate it for its mid-
century roots. Small and unassuming, these homes
have quite often been expanded throughout the years
and may no longer be recognized as a minimal design.
Clues would be traditional styling with multipaned
windows, brick or horizontal lap siding and very
traditional styles for the front door and shutters.
Levittown is a prime examples of minimal traditional
housing.
Besides their small size, minimal traditional homes are
also often less ornamented than their earlier peers
such as Craftsman homes. Particularly after the war,
minimal traditional homes were ubiquitous and the
smaller and less ornamented the homes were, the
easier and faster they were to construct and the
cheaper they were to buy, leading to a great number of
this style in existence today.
6
MODEST HOUSE WITH
SIMPLE MATERIALS
BASIC BOX SHAPE WITH ONE OR
ONE-AND-A-HALF STORIES
SIMPLE, TRADITIONAL
STYLINGS
GABLE ROOF
7
8
MINIMAL TRADITIONAL
MODEST HOUSE WITH
SIMPLE MATERIALS
MAIN HOUSE HAS BASIC
BOX SHAPE WITH ONE OR
ONE-AND-A-HALF
STORIES
SIMPLE, TRADITIONAL
ORNAMENTATION
GABLE ROOF SOMETIMES
INCLUDING DORMERS
GARAGE, MOST OFTEN
DETACHED, BUT MAY BE
PART OF THE HOME IN
LATER YEARS
MODEST HOUSE WITH
SIMPLE MATERIALS
BASIC BOX SHAPE WITH ONE OR
ONE-AND-A-HALF STORIES
SIMPLE, TRADITIONAL
STYLINGS
GABLE ROOF
9
MODEST HOUSE WITH
SIMPLE MATERIALS
BASIC BOX SHAPE WITH
ONE OR ONE-AND-A-HALF
STORIES
SIMPLE, TRADITIONAL
STYLINGS
GABLE ROOF
1O
MINIMAL TRADITIONAL
11
THE REVIVALSTHE REVIVALS
The Revivals are just what the name implies reworks
of the classic styles of early American architecture.
While the revival style dates back to the turn of the 20
th
century, mid-century revival style tends to be less
ornate and at a smaller scale. On Tudor revival homes,
Look for half-timbering and peaked door façades.
Colonial Revival is the most classic of the classic
shutters, symmetry with porches and lean-to add-ons.
Colonial Revival might be seen in both one and two-
story options. Cape Cod revivals have steep roofs, with a
gable-front roof. Most Cape Cod Revivals are one-and-a-
half stories with dormers on the upper story. All of the
revivals are classic, classic, classic and tend to be small
(two to three bedrooms.)
12
TUDOR REVIVAL HAS STEEP,
GABLE-END ROOFS AT THE
FRONT OF THE HOUSE
CLASSIC STYLING – MATERIALS
OFTEN ARE BRICK, STONE OR
STUCCO, BUT CAN BE CLAPBOARD
MULTI-PANED WINDOWS ROUND OR ARCHED-TOP
WINDOWS OR DOORS
ESPECIALLY AT THE ENTRY
13
HALF-TIMBERING AT THE
EAVES AND GABLE ENDS.
MORE ELABORATE TUDOR
REVIVALS MAY BE STUCCO OR
PLASTER
DECORATIVE CHIMNEY
BRICKWORK
ROUND OR ARCHED-TOP
WINDOWS OR DOORS
CHIMNEY ANCHOR
PLATES
14
TUDOR REVIVAL
HIPPED OR
GAMBREL ROOFS
CLASSIC STYLING WITH
SIMPLE MATERIALS
OFTEN CLAPBOARD
MULTI-PANED WINDOWS
AND TRADITIONAL
SHUTTERS.
SYMMETRICAL
FRONT FAÇADE
15
HIPPED OR GAMBREL ROOFS
CLASSIC STYLING WITH
SIMPLE MATERIALS OFTEN
CLAPBOARD
TRADITIONAL SHUTTERS
SYMMETRICAL
FRONT FAÇADE
16
COLONIAL REVIVAL
STEEP ROOF PITCH
SHUTTERS AND OTHER
CLASSICAL NODS
GABLE FRONT ROOF WITH
DORMERS
SYMMETRICAL
FRONT FAÇADE
MULTI-PANED
WINDOWS
17
STEEP ROOF PITCH
SHUTTERS AND OTHER
CLASSICAL NODS
GABLE FRONT ROOF
WITH DORMERS
SYMMETRICAL
FRONT FACE
MULTI-PANED
WINDOWS
18
CAPE COD REVIVAL
19
There are a few housing styles from the early years of
mid-century homes that cannot be categorized as
anything but by their own style. We’re calling these
“non-traditional”.
While they are all in the non-traditional category, they
couldn’t be more different from one another. The first,
the Usonian style, is a mid-century housing style from
architect Frank Lloyd Wright.
ThesecondistheLustronhome;ahomethatisnon-
traditional in the building materials utilized for
construction along with its modern design while still
expressed in a traditional style.
Last is the International Style which impacted both
commercial and residential architecture.
NON-TRADITIONALNON-TRADITIONAL
193Os 195Os
2O
21
USONIANUSONIAN
Based on a concept devised by architect Frank Lloyd
Wright, the Usonian style is an off-shoot of the
architect’s earlier prairie style in a typically more
compact form.
The concept of Usonian is an architectural style that
responds to its site and feels organic. Frank Lloyd
Wright’s concept of Usonian architecture contrasted
sharply with the more traditional and often mass
produced homes of the time. The intention of the
Usonian style was to create affordable, small homes
which were individually designed and responded both
to the needs of each family and to the unique
requirements of the home’s location.
In Usonian architecture, look for long, low lines that
blend with the landscape with natural materials of
wood and stone. The Usonian style is attributed to be
the pre-cursor of the ranch home.
22
VERY LINEAR
DESIGN
NATURAL SETTING
AND MATERIALS
DECORATIVE ACCENTS
OFTEN GEOMETRIC
CAR PORT
(NO GARAGES)
CLERESTORY
WINDOWS
23
LINEAR DESIGN
NATURAL SETTING
AND MATERIALS
CLERESTORY
WINDOWS
DECORATIVE ACCENTS
OFTEN GEOMETRIC
CAR PORT
(NO GARAGES)
24
USONIAN
25
LUSTRONLUSTRON
A short-lived architectural style with distinct mid-
century design features and colors, Lustron was the
brainchild of Carl Strandlund.
Lustrons were proposed as a way to house the many
G.I.’s and their new families as well as a way to keep
wartime factories up and running. The Lustron house
was designed out of a porcelain enameled steel panel
system inside and out that could be factory stamped
and loaded onto specially built trucks and shipped
across the United States for assembly. Key features of
Lustron houses are their unique 24” x 24” metal panel
exterior wall along with their stamp-formed steel roof
shingles.
Lustron came in two-bedroom models and later in
three-bedrooms. The homes came in four colors: Maize
Yellow, Dove Grey, Surf Blue and Desert Tan. The houses
are typically slab-on-grade and one popular style
incorporates a cut-out corner with a splayed, zig-zag
column.
26
24X24 METAL
PANEL SKIN
STAMPED METAL
ROOF SHINGLES
ZIG-ZAG CORNER
POST
ORIGINAL METAL TRIM AND
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
27
24X24 METAL
PANEL SKIN
STAMPED METAL
ROOF SHINGLES
ZIG-ZAG
CORNER POST
28
ORIGINAL
METAL TRIM
LUSTRON
29
INTERNATIONAL STYLEINTERNATIONAL STYLE
International style buildings consist of very rectilinear
forms with no ornamentation. They rely on new
methods of construction; steel and concrete, and
sometimes incorporate cantilevers into the design. The
new materials also allows for great expanses of floor-
to-ceiling glass and little to no structural supports in
the interior creating open floor plans. Roofs are almost
always flat, accentuating the long lines of the buildings.
Most international style buildings are painted white or
very light colors. If traditional-style windows are
utilized, they are ganged together to form large, long
planes of windows that sometime form corners on the
building. Early international style buildings may have
multi-paned steel casement-style windows in lieu of the
large sheets of glass found in later designs.
International style homes were often larger and geared
more towards the upper class homeowner.
3O
FLAT ROOF AND LONG
RECTILINEAR FORM
PREDOMINATELY
WHITE BODY
CANTILEVERED
DESIGN
EXPOSED STRUCTURE AND
LARGE EXPANSES OF GLASS
31
FLAT ROOF AND LONG
RECTILINEAR FORM
PREDOMINATE
WHITE BODY
EXPOSED STEEL
STRUCTURE
LARGE EXPANSES OF
HORIZONTAL GLASS
32
INTERNATIONAL STYLE
33
Also known as Ramblers, Ranch-style homes became
popular in mid-century for their open floor plans
(sound familiar?) and modern styling.
Typical ranch-style homes are long and often low. Look
for overhanging eaves with picture windows in the living
areas and simple double-hung windows in the separate
bedroom portion.
Ranches are often one-story, but multiple story versions
exist. The backs of ranch homes often open up to patios
and yards through sliding glass doors. Trim details are
simple, and materials include brick, stone, and siding.
Siding is often vertical board and batten or brick and
occasionally a horizontal lap.
THE RANCHESTHE RANCHES
194Os 197Os
34
35
RAISED RANCHRAISED RANCH
A raised ranch contains the stylings of a traditional
ranch while adding a finished basement level to the
home. The entry of a raised ranch is half-way between
levels, with stairs leading up to the main floor where
you would find bedrooms and public spaces and stairs
down to the garage and finished basement areas such
as rec rooms.
The Raised Ranch is often mis-labeled a split-level.
36
2
ND
FLOOR
1
ST
FLOOR HALF
BELOW GRADE
ENTRY DOOR AT MID-LEVEL OF
FLOORS – MUST GO UP OR DOWN
STAIRS UPON ENTRY
37
2
ND
FLOOR
1
ST
FLOOR HALF BELOW
GRADE
ENTRY DOOR AT MID-LEVEL OF
FLOORS – MUST GO UP OR DOWN
STAIRS UPON ENTRY
38
RAISED RANCH
39
SPLIT-LEVEL RANCHSPLIT-LEVEL RANCH
A split-level ranch enters into the main living area living
area (living, dining, kitchen), with steps down a half-
level to the finished family/rec room and garage and
steps up a level to the bedrooms and bath. The Split-
Level differs from the Raised Ranch in that the entry to
thehomeisononeofthefloors(mostoftenthemain
level with the public rooms) whereas the Raised Ranch
has a stairwell to go up or down immediately upon
entry. This style may also be referred to as a Side-Split
or a Back-Split depending on the location of the two-
level “split” portion of the home.
4O
41
UPPER LEVEL
(BEDROOMS AND BATH)
LOWER LEVEL (REC ROOM,
GARAGE ENTRY)
MAIN PUBLIC ROOMS (LIVING
ROOM, KITCHEN) AT THE ENTRY
LEVEL OF THE HOME.
UPPER LEVEL
(BEDROOMS AND BATH)
LOWER LEVEL (REC
ROOM, GARAGE ENTRY)
MAIN PUBLIC ROOMS (LIVING
ROOM, KITCHEN) AT THE
ENTRY LEVEL OF THE HOME.
42
SPLIT-LEVEL RANCH
43
TRI-LEVEL RANCHTRI-LEVEL RANCH
Similar to a raised ranch, a tri-level ranch has an entry
on grade into a vestibule or hallway. From the vestibule
you can go up or down a step into the living room and
kitchen areas, up a half-flight to bedrooms and baths,
or down a half flight to the garage and rec rooms. Often
you can only identify a tri-level from the inside
floorplan. From the outside, it may appear to be either a
raised ranch or split-level.
44
ENTRY INTO VESTIBULE OR
HALLWAY
TWO-STORY SECTION OF
HOUSE, LOWER LEVEL
CONTAINS GARAGE AND
REC ROOM.
ONE-STORY SECTION OF HOUSE
WITH LIVING ROOM AND KITCHEN,
DOWN A HALF-STEP FROM ENTRY.
TWO-STORY SECTION OF
HOUSE – UPPER LEVEL
CONTAINS BEDS AND BATHS.
45
UPPER LEVEL
(BEDROOMS AND BATH)
LOWER LEVEL (REC
ROOM, GARAGE, ENTRY)
MAIN PUBLIC ROOMS (LIVING
ROOM, KITCHEN) UP A HALF LEVEL
FROM ENTRY
46
ENTRY INTO VESTIBULE
OR HALLWAY
TRI-LEVEL RANCH
47
STORYBOOK RANCH
STORYBOOK RANCH
Storybook ranches can be any of the ranch
configurations but dressed in fairy-tale finery.
Storybook ranches often have a gable-front section with
ornamental fascia trim along the peak. These ranches
will often have decorative window panes such as a
diamond motif. Storybook ranches may also have a
combination of simple and patterned sidings such as
decoratively shaped shingles. Look, too, for decorative
shutters and in some instances, dovecotes in the gable
peak.
48
DECORATIVE
FASCIA BOARDS
DOVECOTES
EXPOSED
RAFTER TAILS
DECORATIVE
WINDOW MUNTIN
49
DECORATIVE
SHUTTERS
DECORATIVE
FASCIA BOARDS
EXPOSED RAFTER
TAILS
DECORATIVE
WINDOW MUNTINS
AND SHUTTERS
5O
STORYBOOK RANCH
51
When someone uses the general term “mid-century” to
describe a house, mid-century modern is what most
often comes to mind. Elements of modern houses are
picture and casement windows, bold geometric shapes
and large overhanging eaves. Roof lines are low and
often with an interesting shape.
MODERNSMODERNS
195Os 197Os
52
53
There are many minimal modern houses from the mid-
century period. They are often smaller than the
sprawling mid-century modern ranch homes that we
most-often think of and have less grand-scale details.
The hallmarks of the classic modern exist in the picture
window styles and overhanging eaves, but the
geometric shapes are often understated. These homes
also tend to have a smaller footprint.
MINIMAL MODERNMINIMAL MODERN
54
LOW HIPPED ROOF WITH
LARGE OVERHANGS
HORIZONTAL
ACCENTS IN STONE
OR BRICK
LARGE PICTURE
WINDOWS
MAY STILL HAVE SOME
TRADITIONAL TOUCHES
LIKE SHUTTERS
MODERN ACCENTS
55
LOW HIPPED ROOF WITH
LARGE OVERHANGS
ROMAN BRICK
ACCENT
CORNER WINDOWSMAY STILL HAVE SOME
TRADITIONAL TOUCHES
LIKE SHUTTERS
MODERN ACCENTS
56
MINIMAL MODERN
57
A house type synonymous with its developer, Joseph
Eicher, these homes are ranch-style in their overall
horizontality and eave lines. Typical Eichler details
include exposed rafter tails, flat or low-sloped roofs
with gable-end glazing, interior courtyards and wood
and glass construction. Location is also key to spotting
an Eichler they are located in both northern and
southern California. One caveat Eicher did build three
homes in Chestnut Ridge, New York, but if you see a
similar house outside of these areas, it is not an Eichler.
EICHLEREICHLER
58
VERY LOW SLOPE
OR FLAT ROOF
WOOD POST AND BEAM
CONSTRUCTION WITH
EXPOSED RAFTER TAILS
LARGE EXPANSES
OF GLASS
59
VERTICAL WOOD
SIDING
LOW SLOPE OR
FLAT MAIN ROOF
WOOD POST AND BEAM
CONSTRUCTION WITH
PROMINENT RAFTER TAILS
GRAY OR BROWN FIELD
COLORS. MAY HAVE POPS OF
COLORS AT BEAMS
VERTICAL WOOD
SIDING
CENTRAL
ATRIUM
6O
EICHLER
61
Alexander homes were built by the Alexander
Construction Company in collaboration with architects
like William Krisel. Palm Springs, California is the place
to find these beauties. Alexander homes are similar to
Eichler ranches in their minimalistic and
indoor/outdoor design. The distinctive rooflines of
Alexander homes often give them away: butterfly,
slanted and exaggerated gables. Decorative concrete
blocks (breeze blocks) were also often part of the
design. The expansive use of glass brings the outdoors
in in Alexander homes. Like Eichlers you will see
exposed rafter tails and post and beam construction.
ALEXANDERALEXANDER
62
DISTINCTIVE ROOF LINES
WOOD POST AND BEAM
CONSTRUCTION
MINIMAL GLASS ON THE STREET – FRONT
ELEVATION WITH SUBSTANTIAL GLASS
FACING THE PRIVATE YARD, OFTEN WITH A
POOL
63
DISTINCTIVE ROOF LINES
WOOD POST AND BEAM
CONSTRUCTION
CONCRETE BREEZE BLOCK
ACCENTS
64
ALEXANDER
65
The post-war boom in home building was a large
impact on the family home, but was also felt in the
vacation home field. Vacation homes became a must-
have goal for the burgeoning middle-class and home
buildings and plan books were at the ready. From
winter homes in the mountains to homes at the beach
or lake and motor cabins for tourists on their way to
their second homes, plan books covered the gamut.
Vacation homes could be found in all different styles,
from traditional to modern or even new styles like A-
frames and many combinations thereof.
VACATION HOMESVACATION HOMES
195Os 197Os
66
67
A-frame homes are named such that their shape
resembles the capital letter “A” with the steeply peaked
rooflines coming almost all the way to the ground. The
style was easy to construct and quite compact and was
often constructed as a second vacation home for mid-
century families. One or both ends of the A-frame are
often fully glazed, perfect for a vacation home situated
in an idyllic location in the woods, on a lake or in the
mountains.
A-FRAMEA-FRAME
68
69
“A” SHAPE
CONSTRUCTION
WOOD FRAME
CONSTRUCTION
GLAZING ON THE
FRONT FACE
7O
“A” SHAPE
CONSTRUCTION
WOOD FRAME
CONSTRUCTION
GLAZING ON THE
FRONT FACE
A-FRAME
71
Whether mid-century vacation cabins were multiple-
bedroom large houses in vacation locations, or just a
simple rental cabin in the woods, vacation cabins were
a popular purchase during mid-century. Some cabins
carried the hallmarks of traditional mid-century while
other displayed more of the modern aspects of mid-
century architecture. Smaller cabins were often one
room with built-in bunks or divider curtains to make
bedrooms come nightfall. Cabins were often made of
simple materials clapboard or vertical wood siding
but included windows often large picture windows
to capture the setting.
Motor courts in the early mid-century were often made
up of multiple, small, one-room cabins in lieu of the
more traditional motel with think of today.
VACATION CABINVACATION CABIN
72
HALLMARKS OF MID-CENTURY
DESIGN SUCH AS LOW
PITCHED ROOFS AND
OVERHANGS.
MOST OFTEN WOOD
CONSTRUCTION
SUBSTANTIAL GLAZING
TO TAKE IN VIEWS
WOOD SIDING
73
HALLMARKS OF MID-CENTURY
DESIGN SUCH AS LOW
PITCHED ROOFS
MOST OFTEN WOOD
CONSTRUCTION
SUBSTANTIAL GLAZING
TO TAKE IN VIEWS
WOOD SIDING
74
VACATION CABIN
75
With the popularity of vacation homes, log cabins made
a resurgence during mid-century. While still constructed
via traditional methods, mid-century log cabins had
more hallmarks of mid-century design with shallow roof
pitches and overhanging eaves. Large picture windows
were also popular allow natural views into the log-faced
interiors.
LOG CABINLOG CABIN
76
HALLMARKS OF MID-CENTURY
DESIGN SUCH AS LOW
PITCHED ROOFS AND
OVERHANGS.
FLAT OR ROUND LOG
CONSTRUCTION
PICTURE AND CORNER
WINDOWS
MID-CENTURY ACCENTS
77
HALLMARKS OF MID-CENTURY
DESIGN SUCH AS LOW
PITCHED ROOFS AND
OVERHANGS.
FLAT OR ROUND LOG
CONSTRUCTION
PICTURE WINDOWS
78
LOG CABIN
79
Never heard of the word “Populuxe”? The Populuxe term
comes from a mash-up of the terms popular and luxury
and came about in the later mid-century with the rise
of the consumer culture. While the styles under the
Populuxe umbrella greatly vary, one of the defining
characteristics are futuristic shapes and eye-catching
design.
POPULUXEPOPULUXE
195Os 197Os
8O
81
Googie is a style associated with commercial buildings
which originated in California. Think “The Jetsons” with
bright, primary colors, a plethora of neon and bright
lights with bold geometric forms. Starbursts,
boomerangs and other geometric forms are closely
associated with the Googie style and were co-opted for
residential design. Googie is also sometimes referred to
as “Doo-wop”, particularly where the style infiltrated the
east coast. While we mention the east and west coasts
here, Googie architecture can be found throughout the
country. Colorful, optimistic and fun, Googie
architecture is smile-inducing in its playful nature.
GOOGIEGOOGIE
82
SUBSTANTIAL COLOR
(DAY) AND NEON (NIGHT)
BOLD GEOMETRIC SHAPES
FLYING ROOF LINE
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
83
84
BOLD GEOMETRIC
SHAPES
FLYING ROOF
LINE
COMMERCIAL
BUILDING
GOOGIE
85
Space Age architecture take futurism to the extreme,
often appearing to be alien ships which have landed
here on earth. Other influences of the era where the
space race between the United States and Soviet Union
as well as other scientific discoveries. One residential
home that most exemplifies the space age style is the
Futuro homes designed by Matti Suuronen. Only 100
Futuro houses were ever built. Other similar space-
craft-inspired houses are scattered throughout the
United States and other commercial architecture show
the space-age influence.
The Space Age style may be considered a further subset
of the Googie style.
SPACE AGESPACE AGE
86
FORMS REMINISCENT OF
SPACE TRAVEL AND SCIENCE
87
SUBSTANTIAL GLAZING
BOLD SHAPES
88
BOLD SHAPES
REMINISCENT OF SPACE
TRAVEL AND SCIENCE
SUBSTANTIAL GLAZING BOLD SHAPES
SPACE AGE
89
Popularized by Buckminster Fuller in the early 1950’s,
geodesic forms are created of interlocking triangles to
create a domed appearance. The structure of the
Geodesic style is very different than that of a traditional
home which, with its system of load-bearing columns or
walls and beams, is a compressive structure, whereas
the geodesic form is in tension. Geodesic homes are
said to be very energy efficient and are still available for
purchase today.
GEODESICGEODESIC
9O
DOMED SHAPE
91
TRIANGULAR STRUCTURE
92
TRIANGULAR
STRUCTURE
DOMED SHAPE
GEODESIC
93
94
The National Register of Historic Places considers 50
years the age at which a property is deemed historic.
Most (if not all) of these mid-century beauties have now
reached that prime age, but they are still in danger.
Why? Most of these structures, even at the age of 50+,
are considered the recent past, and if it’s in the memory
of those people still alive, then it can’t be historical, can
it? Furthermore, everyday or vernacular structures and
those that are not “high-style” or have an architectural
pedigree are often not considered worthy. These are the
structures we lose daily, to tear-downs and redesigns
and remuddlings. Perhaps the only way to preserve
many of these structures is through documentation
such as the guide you have before you, but we certainly
hope not. Now it’s time to grab your camera and go out
there to photograph some of these styles in the wild.
Happy hunting!
CONCLUSIONCONCLUSION
CREDITSCREDITS
Page 7: The Bristol, from the 1958 Aladdin Redi-Cut
Catalogue. Public Domain Mark 1.0.
Page 8: House number 5305 from Garlinghouse
1955 Plans for New Homes - Public Domain
Mark 1.0
Page 9: A minimal traditional home in Portland,
Oregon. CC BY-SA 4.0. Photographer: Ian
Poellet.
Page 10: A minimal traditional home in Knoxville,
Tennessee. CC BY-SA 3.0. Photographer:
Brian Stansberry.
Page 13: A Tudor Revival home Model 24 from the
1955 Garlinghouse Plans for New Homes.
Public Domain Mark 1.0.
Page 14: A Tudor Revival house in Los Angeles,
California. CC BY-SA 3. Carson Willington.
Page 15: The Tacoma, a Colonial Revival house from
the 1958 Aladdin Redi-Cut Homes catalog.
Public Domain Mark 1.0.
95
96
Page 16: A Dutch Colonial Revival in Sauk Prairie,
Wisconsin. CC BY-SA 3.0. Photographer:
Corey Coyle.
Page 17: A Cape Cod Revival house from the 1955
Garlinghouse Plans for New Homes. Public
Domain Mark 1.0.
Page 18: A Cape Cod Revival in Middleton,
Wisconsin. CC BY-SA 3.0. Photographer:
Corey Coyle.
Page 23: Laurel, a 1956 Usonian home designed by
Frank Lloyd Wright in Wilmington,
Delaware. CC0. Photographer: Smallbones.
Page 24: The Melvyn Maxwell & Sara Stein Smith
Usonian home designed by Frank Lloyd
Wright in 1950 in Bloomfield Township,
Michigan. CC BY-SA 3.0. Photographer:
Andrew Jameson.
Page 27: Lustron home in surf blue, Jamestown, New
York. CC0. Photographer: Nyttend.
Page 28: Lustron in Maize Yellow in Huron, South
Dakota. CC0. Photographer: Ammodramus.
Page 31: The Farnsworth house by Mies Van Der
Rohe from 1951. CC BY-SA 2.0.
Photographer: Marco 2000.
Page 32: The Inadomi House by Richard Neutra from
1960. CC BY-SA 4.0 International.
Photographer: MichaelJLocke.
Page 37: House number 9714 from the 1963
Garlinghouse All American Homes catalog.
Public Domain 1.0.
Page 38: Raised Ranch or Bi-Level Ranch in a
Colonial Revival style. CC BY-SA 3.0.
Photographer: Adamwe12.
Page 41: A split-level ranch, number 705 by National
Plan Service in their 1961 Multi-Level
Homes catalog. CC0 1.0 Universal.
97
Page 41: House model 705 from the Multi-Level
Homes catalog from National Plan Service
1961. CC 1.0 Universal.
Page 42: The Des Moine split-level from the 1963
Miles Homes catalogue. Public Domain
Mark 1.0.
Page 45: The Cornell, a tri-level ranch in the 1958
Aladdin Redi-Cut Homes brochure. Public
Domain Mark 1.0.
Page 46: Tri-Level home. CC BY-SA3.0. Photographer:
Adamwe12.
Page 49: A storybook ranch from the Hiawatha T.
Estes house plan book Prize Homes from
1969. CC0 1.0 Universal.
Page 50: Storybook Ranch, Lodi, California. Google
Maps 2012.
Page 55: Minimal Modern home Model 1856 from
the Garlinghouse New Small Homes
catalog, 10
th
Edition. Public Domain Mark
1.0.
98
Page 56: Minimal Modern home in St. Louis,
Missouri. CC0. Photograph by author.
Page 59: Eichler Home from the 1955 Eichler Catalog.
Public Domain Mark 1.0.
Page 55: The 1962-64 Foster Residence by Joseph
Eichler in the Balboa Heights
neighborhood of Granada Hills, California.
CC BY-SA 3.0. Photographer: LosAngeles.
Page 63: Alexander Butterfly home by William Krisel
in Palm Springs, California. CC BY 2.0.
Photographer: Randy Heinitz.
Page 64: Alexander home in Palm Springs,
California. Carol M. Highsmith's America,
Library of Congress, Prints and
Photographs Division. No known
restrictions.
99
Page 69: The Ranger A-Frame cabin from the
Douglas Fir Plywood Association’s Second
Homes for Leisure Living published in 1960.
CC0 1.0 Universal.
Page 70: A-Frame cabin on Turtle Lake in
Saskatchewan from the 1950’s. CC BY-SA 3.0
Unported. Photographer: Regriemer.
Page 73: Vacation Home - National Plan Service
Summer Living 1953 - Public Doman Mark
1.0
Page 74: The Rainier vacation Cabin from the 1961
Weyerhaeuser Gracious Outdoor Living
catalog. CC 1.0 Universal
Page 77: Georgia plan No. 20-A log cabin from the
1957 Pioneer Log Cabin Co. Book of Plans.
Public Domain Mark 1.0.
Page 78: The Chippy vacation home as seen in 1956.
Use by permission from Crow Wing Crest
Resort. All rights reserved.
1OO
1O1
Page 83: Googie restaurant in La Cienga, California.
CC BY-2.0 Generic. Photographer: Sharon
VanderKaay.
Page 84: Googie flying saucer Starbucks in St. Louis,
Missouri. CC BY-2.0 Generic. Photographer:
Paul Sableman.
Page 87: Futuro House in Pensacola Beach, Florida.
CC BY-SA 2.0. Photographer: TimothyJ.
Page 88: LAX (Los Angeles Airport) control tower in
Los Angeles, California. CC BY-SA 2.0.
Photographer: Jeff Turner.
Page 91: The 1960 Buckminster Fuller Home in
Carbondale, Illinois. CC BY-SA 4.0.
Photographer: Communityhelper1000.
Page 92: The 1963 Cinerama Theater in Hollywood,
California. CC0. Photographer: UpdateNerd.
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